Except the days when it’s not and I feel more like staff. The tired list of tasks on replay in my mind. Planning to spend time with my daughter when the baby naps. Wondering when the best time will be today to have a shower. Not speaking to another adult for an entire day. Being a stay at home mum should be easy, but sometimes it’s just hard.

Everything’s Fine.

Ask me how I am and I will say good, because things are good. My husband goes to work every day to a job he enjoys, he earns a good wage and I quit work 7 years ago to stay home and raise our kids. Together we’ve made a nice home, we have nice friends, we go to church every Sunday as a family. There is nothing ‘wrong’. I will tell you things are good because they are, and because I can’t quite put my finger on what isn’t.

 

 

Everything's Rosy, Thanks!

 

Homeschooling my 7yr old and caring for my 15month old baby means my days are busy and filled with the over-riding sense that not one of us is quite getting their needs fully met. If I’m singing with the baby my 7yr/o is watching YouTube. When I’m teaching my daughter, the baby is pulling my trouser leg for attention. When I’m cooking or cleaning, they’re both watching Peppa Pig. If there is any pause in the day I can guarantee it is some kind of meal time. Meals which take me time to make (and I hate cooking) then battle with my daughter to eat and at the end throw most of the food away anyway.

Feeling Valued

My list of tasks -usual stuff like laundry- conflicts with the real reason I’m home which is to spend time nurturing my kids. Chiding myself that I even want to waste time on the house while simultaneously feeling the most accomplished I have all week when it’s mess-free. Feeling resentful that such menial tasks are my only way of feeling valued. Breastfeeding a toddler to sleep whilst typing one handed.

Things are good, overall. But sometimes the day-to-day can get me down. It goes without saying that I am so grateful for my family. I thank God for them every day, lots and lots of times a day.

I don’t have much to moan about when my life’s biggest stressor is whether or not to brave the supermarket with two kids in tow. But I seem to have managed it anyway! There are much bigger things to worry about but sometimes it’s just harder than it looks from the outside looking in. I can kindly give myself the grace to say that is OK, and you can too.

Keep Calm and Carry On Linking Sunday

I’ve been thinking about taking my little boy for his first hair cut. It’s one of the ‘firsts’ parents talk about and write in memory books. Beb is 15 months old and he’s still got that fluffy baby hair (I love it!) but it’s long enough that I find I’m side swiping it across his forehead to get it out of the way. I feel a bit unsure about getting his hair cut though and it was this feeling that got me thinking about children’s hair cuts in general.

Little Boys with Long Hair

Hanging around in the home ed community a lot lately, I have noticed a lot of the boys have long hair. Not long-ish, or grunge-y type long, but waist-long flowing golden locks. I’ve met so many boys with the same hairstyle I began to wonder if it is a home-ed thing? And if it is, then why? Why long and not blue or spiky or anything else?

Should You Cut Your Baby's Hair?

I like sharing pics of the back of his head on Insta.

I started thinking about Beb’s hair and when I should get it cut. The word should was what struck me. ‘Should’ according to what? Well-meaning advice? The infamous red book? I decided just as soon as it got a bit long I would take him for his first hair cut. He’s going to hate it. I just know. Then like a bolt from the blue it clicked into place. Maybe the mums of the boys I have met being the awesome thinking outside of the box type people they are, have chosen to disregard the unwritten rule book of children’s hair cuts. And maybe there are some very good reasons they have.

Rights and Decisions

Perhaps it’s more than just a hairstyle. Perhaps the thinking behind it is to enable their children make decisions about their own appearance and not enforce perceived norms upon them in the meanwhile. I mean, who decides boys or men have to have short hair? Do I have the right to decide for my child how he will look, or what is the ‘right’ way for him to look?

I know this thinking will probably face some criticism, after all I choose his clothes everyday for him and so forth. I do make a lot of decisions for him and on his behalf, some of which he is generally unhappy about (nappy changes spring to mind). But while he is busy being a baby and later, a child playing or running around a park, not thinking about his hair or other people’s opinions of his hair, would it hurt for me to wait a while and let him make his own decisions about his appearance? Is his first haircut setting me on an oblivious path of only being able to consider my child’s autonomy when it suits me?  It’s such a minor thing, hair. I wonder if leaving his hair to grow out until he wants to make his own decision on it allows a stronger message to reach my kids about making our own personal choices.

Should You Cut Your Baby's hair

Another picture of the back of his head.

Prejudices

Maybe these Mamma’s have gone before me and reached the same fork in the road and have considered their actions the same way I am. Isn’t that always a comforting thought to remember people have walked the same path before you?

A simple haircut that seems a small thing has thrown up a chance to consider my parenting, and to help my children navigate their way through society’s pre-set ideas about how they ‘should’ look. I had a real a-ha moment there in my kitchen thinking about kids with long hair. Suddenly I had even more respect for the women and families who are encouraging their kids to be who they are by actions and thoughts as well as words. What an amazing gift to their children.

As a famous company strap-line says, ‘There’s more to life than hair, but it’s a good place to start.’ I’m glad Beb’s first hair cut got me thinking about these things. I still even after this soul searching will more than likely take Beb for his first hair-cut. What can I say, I’m not strong enough to confront society’s prejudices so openly quite yet? Maybe that’s another blog post.

 

Usually in our house if there are bugs going around just one of us will get it. My 6yr old brings a lot home from school, mainly coughs and colds, but Rich and I rarely pick it up as well. If we do, there is usually one of us on form enough to take on the lion’s share of the care. This week we have all been ill all at once with an horrible fluey virus which seemed to manifest itself slightly differently in each of us. I initially thought it was a cold until one night when my internal thermometer was having trouble figuring out if I was in a fiery furnace or the Arctic Circle which didn’t translate well for me physiologically. Needless to say it has been quite a miserable week culminating in a cancelled 1st birthday party (sad face emoticon). You know when mum is sick it too it must be bad.

Child no 1

So Beg had it first, but she covers well. The thought she could possibly be missing out on some amazing fun activity is too much temptation for her to admit to feeling rough. I only ever know she is genuinely ill when I can convince her to lay on the couch in the day. On top of that she saw the neighbours kids pull up and asked if she could go to knock for them and when I said “maybe in 5 mins” she didn’t even argue and later declared herself too tired to play anyway. That’s when I really start feeling bad for her!

Man Flu

Rich got it next and started feeling really rough on babba’s birthday while we were visiting a farm. Not adverse to the odd bout of man flu, he can also be a right trooper as well – he was so awesome when both our babies were born – In fact once I’d caught this one too I felt sorry for him having to go to work.

siblings

Child no 2

I’m the first to know the baby is ill because he gets even more clingy than usual. I’m sure any mum can empathise with the clingy baby situation. As in don’t-even-think-about-leaving-my-line-of-sight clingy. Taking the baby to the toilet with you for a pee clingy. Unfortunately Beb’s virus presented as croup for him. I’ve never ‘seen’ croup in real life before but if you ever have, you will know what I mean when I say the noise they make with the cough is quite worrying. It was a very loud seal like barking cough that just came on really suddenly. Thanks be to Google for it’s 24hr wisdom, I was pretty sure it was croup. I took him up the Drs the next morning to be checked over. She prescribed him a steroid to open his airway in case he needed it but I held off administering it as it sounded like a heavy medication and he was doing ok. Happy to say 2 days later his cough is definitely improving.

Mum Flu

So then it was my turn. 1st stage complete denial, as I’m sure most mums do. 2nd stage – fear, “Oh no I think I’m ill and I have 1,2,3 things to do.” 3rd stage – admit defeat and so ensues miserable slopping about the house in pj’s and slippers praying  for a fairy godmother (one like Jennifer Saunders in Shrek if possible because she’s hilarious).

It’s no fun when the whole family is sick at the same time and I was a bit sad to cancel the baby’s party. A few days later and we are all on the mend and life goes on. I’m just thankful that it was just a virus and not a sickness bug (nobody needs extra laundry when they’re sick) and that Beb’s cough is getting better, not worse. It brings it home that we live in a place where I can just zoom the baby to the doctors if I am worried. How have you coped when the whole family has had an illness at the same time? Do you find it hard to ask for help? Do you use any natural remedies to prevent illness that you would recommend? Let me know below.

Hopefully we are at the end of flu season now and we can begin to look forward to long summer days of warmth and sunshine.

My husband said something really interesting to me the other day. It wasn’t so much what he said so much as the way he said it that struck me.

He told me that he thinks that what I do being a stay-at-home-mum is much harder than what he does going to work. Ahh how lovely, right? Which is what I usually think and carry on with my day but this time it was something about the way he said it that made me realise he actually genuinely means it.

The conversation was nothing to do with our home life, he was talking to a friend at work about paternity leave. This friend and his wife are sharing maternity leave so he was asking for advice about how much time would be good to take off work. So they were chatting about it and Rich said I wouldn’t like to stay off too long (back hackles up) because what my wife does is much harder than what I do (phew rescued yourself there son). Now, I have heard him say this before and always just thought that’s nice of him. But I could see he really meant it this time (mostly because he was laughing that said person was naively shocked that stay at home parenting is hard). But I was quite taken aback. I realised that all this time he’d actually meant it! And I felt really proud of myself!

Gin

Some days are easier than others.

Rich gets a lot (a lot) of validation at work. He works hard and is good at his job. As it’s a sales job when he hits his targets he gets bonuses, if he wins a big account his phone buzzes with well done messages from his team, there is a camaraderie and ‘in’ jokes and nicknames and so on and so on. But sahm mum’s don’t get that. Nobody ever walks past me doing the laundry and says “great job Kate, I see you are going out of your way to boil wash the sicky muslin, well done not slacking and just doing a quick 40 wash.” I don’t get a text message from my mate calling me Mrs Wonderflaps saying “Well done you’re killing this whole motherhood thing” and I certainly don’t get vouchers at Christmas or a bottle of fizz. But did I ever get that kind of pat on the back in my old job in the office? Not really. Do any of my hard slogging wonder mummy friends get any kind of notice in their day jobs or their home lives “You just helped that older person with dementia get the right care package and you’re an amazing mum too, here’s a £100 bonus.”

Award

He actually got a real life trophy.

I had my first ever PR invite for the blog a couple of weeks ago (keep your eyes peeled) and I was so excited. It felt good to have a little validation from outside the home. As a stay at home mum a pat on the back isn’t usually on my radar. I love staying home with my children, and I truly feel so happy to be able to. We work as a team in our house and I really do feel like that. But there was definitely something special in realising that my husband thinks I’m awesome. There was definitely a spark of excitement to receive an email about my blog because it’s something only I have done. And there was definitely something special about nagging my 6 yr old to keep her room tidy because I just cleaned it and getting the reply “Thanks Mum”.

Dear Bear and Beany

Keep Calm and Carry On Linking Sunday

Today was a bit of a wash out and in trying to complete 100 things I only managed to do one.

I think I got a bit excited it was the weekend and husband is home. The prospect of having another adult around to well, adult with me, got a bit overwhelming and I messed up the whole day. Our plans for this Saturday got cancelled so we had planned instead to get some DIY done. Then I had a brilliant idea

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